Only four Qatar 2022 FIFA World Cup sponsors addressing migrant worker risk – Insidethegames.biz

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Only four of the 19 sponsors for the Qatar 2022 FIFA World Cup have engaged in the risk to migrant workers involved in the tournament, with companies such as McDonald’s, Visa and Crypto failing to disclose this information on human rights.
Adidas, Budweiser, Coca-Cola and Qatar Airways responded to the Business & Human Rights Resource Centre, which Gulf programme manager of Business & Human Rights Resource Centre Isobel Archer says is not enough.
“It’s disappointing that at a time when football teams and fans are beginning to sit up and take note of Qatar’s poor record on workers’ rights, sponsors continue to be largely disengaged,” said Archer. 
“Companies which have been awarded sponsorship deals should, at an absolute minimum, recognise this comes with human rights responsibilities – broad platitudes about conducting business in a socially responsible manner are not enough. 
“While three of the five FIFA sponsors have taken the important first step of having publicly available human rights policies, this is the bare minimum in a process of actively addressing human rights issues.
“In a region where migrant workers continue to face well-documented risks during recruitment and employment, FIFA and World Cup sponsors have a responsibility to operationalise human rights standards.
“The lack of transparent information we’ve received and the failure of brands to adequately demonstrate any satisfactory steps towards assessing risk to workers and establishing safeguards is extremely alarming. 
“These are big name brands who should not remain silent.
“They must recognise their role in holding to account the sporting associations, brands and clubs they choose to partner with when they fall short on human and workers’ rights standards.”
Coca-Cola is the only tournament sponsor to make a public statement on migrant workers, while four of the seven FIFA partners – Adidas, Coca-Cola, Hyundai Kia Motor and Visa – have published human rights policies.
Budweiser and McDonald’s, two of the seven Qatar World Cup sponsors, have also published a policy.
Budweiser, Coca-Cola and Qatar Airways did not respond with due diligence, such as disclosing data on payment of recruitment fees by migrant workers.
None of the regional sponsors – GWC, UPL, Ooredoo, The Look Company and Algorand – responded or had human rights policies, nor did World Cup sponsors Hisense, Vivo, Mengniu, Crypto and BYJU’s; as well as FIFA sponsors Wanda, Visa and QatarEnergy.
A Guardian report suggested that more than 6,500 labourers from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka have died in the country since Qatar was controversially awarded the World Cup in 2010.
Thirty-seven of these deaths were directly linked to the construction of stadiums for the tournament.
According to Human Rights Watch, Qatari authorities have not investigated the causes of deaths of thousands of the labourers and have labelled a large number of them “natural causes”.
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Michael Houston is a reporter at insidethegames.biz. He has worked at several major events, including the cycling at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games. He also has experience working for the World Curling Federation and British Athletics.
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For nearly 15 years now, insidethegames.biz has been at the forefront of reporting fearlessly on what happens in the Olympic Movement. As the first website not to be placed behind a paywall, we have made news about the International Olympic Committee, the Olympic and Paralympic Games, the Commonwealth Games and other major events more accessible than ever to everybody. 
insidethegames.biz has established a global reputation for the excellence of its reporting and breadth of its coverage. For many of our readers from more than 200 countries and territories around the world the website is a vital part of their daily lives. The ping of our free daily email alert, sent every morning at 6.30am UK time 365 days a year, landing in their inbox, is as a familiar part of their day as their first cup of coffee.
Even during the worst times of the COVID-19 pandemic, insidethegames.biz maintained its high standard of reporting on all the news from around the globe on a daily basis. We were the first publication in the world to signal the threat that the Olympic Movement faced from the coronavirus and have provided unparalleled coverage of the pandemic since. 
As the world begins to emerge from the COVID crisis, insidethegames.biz would like to invite you to help us on our journey by funding our independent journalism. Your vital support would mean we can continue to report so comprehensively on the Olympic Movement and the events that shape it. It would mean we can keep our website open for everyone. Last year, nearly 25 million people read insidethegames.biz, making us by far the biggest source of independent news on what is happening in world sport. 
Every contribution, however big or small, will help maintain and improve our worldwide coverage in the year ahead. Our small and dedicated team were extremely busy last year covering the re-arranged Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo, an unprecedented logistical challenge that stretched our tight resources to the limit. 
The remainder of 2022 is not going to be any less busy, or less challenging. We had the Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games in Beijing, where we sent a team of four reporters, and coming up are the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, the Summer World University and Asian Games in China, the World Games in Alabama and multiple World Championships. Plus, of course, there is the FIFA World Cup in Qatar.
Unlike many others, insidethegames.biz is available for everyone to read, regardless of what they can afford to pay. We do this because we believe that sport belongs to everybody, and everybody should be able to read information regardless of their financial situation. While others try to benefit financially from information, we are committed to sharing it with as many people as possible. The greater the number of people that can keep up to date with global events, and understand their impact, the more sport will be forced to be transparent.
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